Monday, August 15, 2016

Miss Cellania's Links

10 Confessions of Car Salemen. It’s not an easy way to make a living.

My Crazy Year with Trump. The life of a journalist assigned to cover the presidential candidate.

Breaking down the best slapstick GIF we've ever seen. In five seconds, there’s a lot going that needs to be explained. (via Metafilter)

The Death of Flair: As Friday's Goes Minimalist, What Happens to the Antiques?

An Unusually Well-crafted Obituary for William Ziegler. This is the most New Orleans thing you’ll read today. (via Fark)

This Bible-Era Solution For Saving Food Is Making A Comeback. Organizations are using gleaning after the harvest to move produce to food banks and shelters.

The Mummified Train Robber Who Became a Circus Prop. He couldn’t catch a break even after death.

America's birth rate is now a national emergency. We need to make raising children easier, or our culture will eventually stagnate.
   
Canada Lynx: The Ghost Cat of the North. A strange, elusive, but beautiful animal.

The 2016 Bulwer-Lytton Fiction Contest Winners. Awards for the worst opening sentence of a yet-to-be-written novel. (via Metafilter)  

7 comments:

Vincent Rivoire said...

Hi miss!


Been watching your posts since 2005, you're great (sorry I'm french Canadian, please excuse me, I'm sorry again ;-))
I'm quite impressed that the united states* are realizing the problem(s) of birth ratios. In Germany, Canada, Sweden, Denmark, to name a few industrialized countries, they have full plans to promote pregnancy. For I in Canada, my wife receive a salary from the government. But in Norway they are planing to give wife and husbands vacations for reproducing and a full 3 year supplies...

In the same order, I have been in new Hampshire/ Main a few years ago and the reason for this post?
No children allowed in most of the tourist hotel (dog/cats not allowed either); in Germany they did the same and now they byte their nail on who in going to pay their retirement/social security/ taxes and so on...


* BTW, this is not a name for a nation since there is quite a few other places in America that are united...

Miss Cellania said...

Hi Vincent! The linked article points out that we SHOULD be concerned, but aren't. We are never going to have paid maternity leave, free daycare, adequate education, or any of those benefits for families that will cost taxpayer dollars, because too many Americans have the philosophy that no one should get anything for free.

Vincent Rivoire said...

Ok SHOULD:

I'm suprised with your thouths

Skipe?&nbsp you<ve got my email :-)...

but :
Should

English Grammar - Modal Verbs


Should is a modal verb.

After Should you use the base form of the infinitive (= verb without To e.g. Go instead of To Go)

Should + Verb (base form of infinitive)

e.g. You should go now (do not say: You should to go now.)

SHOULD
1. To give advice, a recommendation or a suggestion

This is to say that it is the right thing to do or the correct thing.

Does your tooth still hurt? You should make an appointment with the dentist.
I think you should study for the test so that you don't fail.
Your hair is too long. You should get a haircut.
You really should go to the new restaurant on Main Street.
2. Expresses that a situation is likely in the present

Mary should be at home by now. Give her a call.
He should have the letter by now. I sent it a couple of weeks ago.
3. Expresses that a situation is likely in the future (prediction)

They should win the game because they are a much better team.
I posted the cheque yesterday so it should arrive this week.
It should be fine tomorrow.
4. Expresses an obligation that is not as strong as Must.

Sometimes Should is used instead of Must to make rules, orders or instructions sound more polite. This may appear more frequently on formal notices or on information sheets.

On hearing the fire alarm, hotel guests should leave their room immediately.
Passengers should check in at least 2 hours before departure time.
You should never lie to your doctor.
You should pay more attention in class.
You should be at work before 9.
All of the above example sentences can have must instead of should making the obligation stronger and less polite.

5. Was expected in the past but didn't happen (should + have + past participle)

This expresses the idea that the subject did not fulfill their obligation in the past or did not act responsibly.

You should have given your boss the report yesterday when he asked for it.
I should have studied more but I was too tired.
6. Not fulfilling an obligation (should + be + verb-ing)

This expresses the idea that the subject is not fulfilling their obligation or is not acting sensibly.

You should be wearing your seatbelt. (The person isn't wearing one right now)
We should be studying for the test. (We are not studying right now and we should)
7. Sometimes should is replaced by ought to without a change in meaning. Note that ought to sounds more formal and is used less frequently.

You ought to study more. (= you should study more)
He ought to go home. (= He should go home)
They ought to stop doing that. (= They should stop doing that)

Vincent Rivoire said...

Ok SHOULD:

I'm suprised with your thouths

Skipe?&nbsp you<ve got my email :-)...

but :
Should

English Grammar - Modal Verbs


Should is a modal verb.

After Should you use the base form of the infinitive (= verb without To e.g. Go instead of To Go)

Should + Verb (base form of infinitive)

e.g. You should go now (do not say: You should to go now.)

SHOULD
1. To give advice, a recommendation or a suggestion

This is to say that it is the right thing to do or the correct thing.

Does your tooth still hurt? You should make an appointment with the dentist.
I think you should study for the test so that you don't fail.
Your hair is too long. You should get a haircut.
You really should go to the new restaurant on Main Street.
2. Expresses that a situation is likely in the present

Mary should be at home by now. Give her a call.
He should have the letter by now. I sent it a couple of weeks ago.
3. Expresses that a situation is likely in the future (prediction)

They should win the game because they are a much better team.
I posted the cheque yesterday so it should arrive this week.
It should be fine tomorrow.
4. Expresses an obligation that is not as strong as Must.

Sometimes Should is used instead of Must to make rules, orders or instructions sound more polite. This may appear more frequently on formal notices or on information sheets.

On hearing the fire alarm, hotel guests should leave their room immediately.
Passengers should check in at least 2 hours before departure time.
You should never lie to your doctor.
You should pay more attention in class.
You should be at work before 9.
All of the above example sentences can have must instead of should making the obligation stronger and less polite.

5. Was expected in the past but didn't happen (should + have + past participle)

This expresses the idea that the subject did not fulfill their obligation in the past or did not act responsibly.

You should have given your boss the report yesterday when he asked for it.
I should have studied more but I was too tired.
6. Not fulfilling an obligation (should + be + verb-ing)

This expresses the idea that the subject is not fulfilling their obligation or is not acting sensibly.

You should be wearing your seatbelt. (The person isn't wearing one right now)
We should be studying for the test. (We are not studying right now and we should)
7. Sometimes should is replaced by ought to without a change in meaning. Note that ought to sounds more formal and is used less frequently.

You ought to study more. (= you should study more)
He ought to go home. (= He should go home)
They ought to stop doing that. (= They should stop doing that)

Vincent Rivoire said...

ok, I was a bit , sorry (CDN)
But your opinion counts and I whant to understanand what is hapenig in this part of the midle north america

pls rspd

Vincent Rivoire said...

sorry 4 the double post

Miss Cellania said...

Okay, we ought to be concerned.