Tuesday, February 28, 2012

John F. Kennedy on Religion and Politics



The future president spoke on September 12, 1960 on the separation of church and state -to a gathering of ministers! Yes, at the time, voters were wary of electing a Catholic to the presidency. To this day, Kennedy is the only Catholic to be elected president. We've come a long way since then -candidate Rick Santorum said this speech made him want to throw up. (via Metafilter)

7 comments:

Cheryl said...

Rick Santorum is an ass. His only hope of being listed in the same sentence as Kennedy is by making a douche-y comment like this one.

Anonymous said...

Although philosophically more Republican than Democrat I'd much prefer a womanizing, clear-minded patriot over a lily-white and pure, religion-confused wuss anytime. JFK knew for what he was responsible. It appears Santorum knows to whom he is responsible.

Anonymous said...

As a devout Catholic and an attorney I am greatly disappointed in Mr. Santorum's candidacy. Jesus taught us to look out for the least of us: the elderly, the impoverished, the uneducated. For some reason, the message of the Republican party has become "I've got mine." I was raised that as a good citizen I contribute to the common good. Though I have no kids, I pay my taxes for education. Oh, and I'm a Iraq veteran, too.

Anonymous said...

What all of you seem to miss, perhaps intentionally, is that no where in the US Constitution or ANY of the founding documents does the phrase "Separation of Church and State" exist. Perhaps, JFK's spouting a unequivocal falsehood was what made Santorum want to puke.
I know seeing a Harvard educated attorney, and President of the United States being that dumb makes me want to puke

Anonymous said...

The phrase, "Separation of Church and State" comes from a letter written by Jefferson to the Danbury Baptists.
If that is establishing law, I'd hate to see the effect of Clinton's notes to Lewinsky instituted...

Miss Cellania said...

The words refer to the First Amendment to the US Constititution, which says:

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

The first sentence of called The Establishment Clause, but it is easier to explain as "the separation of church and state."

It's easy to think mixing religion and government is fine and dandy, as long as it is YOUR religion. If it were some other religion, then the need for such a separation become evdennt.

Miss Cellania said...

The words refer to the First Amendment to the US Constititution, which says:

"Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

The first sentence of called The Establishment Clause, but it is easier to explain as "the separation of church and state."

It's easy to think mixing religion and government is fine and dandy, as long as it is YOUR religion. If it were some other religion, then the need for such a separation become evdennt.